How to Drive Customers Away AT&T Style

August 27, 2010 at 9:48 AM Leave a comment

A couple of days ago I offered a general primer on driving customers away. Now here’s a specific example.

A colleague of mine who uses AT&T recently called customer service. That went fine – they fixed his problem in a professional manner. But then he got an automated callback from the company asking him to complete a survey. The voice said:

“If you are the person who recently interacted with the automated telephone system on the phone, and you can participate now, Press1. If you do wish to participate, we thank you for your business and look forward to serving you the next time. You can simply hang up.”

[He presses 1]

“… Press 1. If you do wish to participate. We thank you for your business and look forward to serving you the next time. You can simply hang up.”

[He presses 1 again]

“… Press 1. If you do wish to participate. We thank you for your business and look forward to serving you the next time. You can simply hang up.”

[He presses 1 again]

“… Press 1. If you do wish to participate. We thank you for your business and look forward to serving you the next time. You can simply hang up.”

[He simply hangs up]

Advertisements

Entry filed under: Uncategorized. Tags: .

How to Drive Customers Away With a Survey Is Permission Marketing Dead?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Trackback this post  |  Subscribe to the comments via RSS Feed


Thompson Morrison

Thompson Morrison

About Thompson

As CEO of FUSE Insight, Thompson Morrison uses powerful new web interviewing technologies to help businesses better align their brand with the needs and aspirations of their customers. Learn more at www.fuseinsight.com

 

"The single most significant strategic strength that an organization can have is not a good strategic plan, but a commitment to strategic listening on the part of every member of the organization." -- Tom Peters

Subscribe

twitter

%d bloggers like this: